2017 Nissan GT-R Walk Around

The GT-R doesn’t look like a supercar. You can tell it’s special, but it doesn’t announce its supercar status. With its jagged and bulky luxury coupe outline, it could be mistaken for a kit car, with anime armor: boisterous fender flares, deeply scooped air intakes, and a comically large rear wing. Not to mention the roofline’s tomahawk slice that chops into the rear end.

Cars like the Porsche, Mercedes, and Ferrari or Lamborghini are unmistakable. The GT-R is overlookable.

For 2017, the styling changes include a new Nissan V-Motion grille with a different mesh pattern and matte finish; it’s also larger, for better cooling. A revised chin spoiler and bumper add downforce, while the hood is made sturdier and tweaked with pronounced character lines. The 20-inch wheels are a new 15-spoke design.

The beltline has been raised and the rockers widened for better aerodynamics. The rear end gets functional vents next to the quad exhaust outlets and under the bumper that’s taken from the 2015 Nismo, for better airflow at high speed. Nissan says the changes make the GT-R more stable at high speed, while keeping the 0.26 coefficient of drag.


There is an Infiniti level of refinement in the Nissan GT-R cabin. The instrument panel on the new horizontal dashboard is wrapped in Nappa leather, and features 16 fewer buttons than before, down to 11 from a bewildering 27. The center touchscreen grows from seven inches to eight, a Display Command controller is added to the center console, the NissanConnect system with navigation and access to mobile apps is now standard.

The new lighter seats have good comfort and support. The shift paddles are moved from the steering column to the steering wheel where they’re easier to use in the turns.

There’s good room in the front, and the rear seat is fine for two kids; for adults back there, headroom is a bigger issue than legroom. There’s also good trunk space. A rearview camera is standard, and necessary, as the thick rear pillars block the rearward visibility.

The 2017 cabin is a huge 10 decibels quieter, according to Nissan, thanks to more sound deadening material and an acoustic glass windshield, along with the existing noise cancellation system. But you can still hear the high-strung engine, thanks to a new titanium exhaust system. The twin turbos create a jet-like whine mixed with a low howl.

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